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Motherhood
Motherhood
 
 

If you want your children to turn out well, spend twice as much time with them, and half as much money.

Abigail Van Buren
 
 
 
 

Mothers are fonder of their children than fathers, for they remember the pain of bringing them forth, and are surer that they are their own

Aristotle
 
 
 
 

"You agreed to get up nights."
This is true. I stumble into the nursery, pick up my son, so small, so perfect, and as he fastens himself to me like a tiny sucking minnow, I am flooded with tenderness.

Sara Davidson
 
 
     
 

...blest the babe,
Nursed in his Mother's arms, who sucks to sleep
Rocked on his Mother's breast, who with his soul
Drinks in the feelings of his Mother's eye.

William Wordsworth
 
     
 
 

No ordinary work done by a man is either as hard or as responsible as the work of a woman who is bringing up a family of small children; for upon her time and strength demands are made not only every hour of the day but often every hour of the night.

Theodore Roosevelt
 
 
 
 

I cannot with the utmost energy of imagination conceive what they mean. When domesticity, for instance, is called drudgery, all the difficulty arises from a double meaning in the word. If drudgery only means dreadfully hard work, I admit the woman drudges in the home, as a man might drudge at the Cathedral of Amiens or drudge behind a gun at Trafalgar. But if it means that the hard work is more heavy because it is trifling, colorless and of small import to the soul, then as I say, I give it up; I do not know what the words mean. To be Queen Elizabeth within a definite area, deciding sales, banquets, labors and holidays; to be Whiteley within a certain area, providing toys, boots, sheets cakes, and books, to be Aristotle within a certain area, teaching morals, manners, theology, and hygiene; I can understand how this might exhaust the mind, but I cannot imagine how it could narrow it. How can it be a large career to tell other people's children about the Rule of Three, and a small career to tell one's own children about the universe? How can it be broad to be the same thing to everyone, and narrow to be everything to someone? No; a woman's function is laborious, but because it is gigantic, not because it is minute I will pity Mrs. Jones for the hugeness of her task; I will never pity her for its smallness.

G.K. Chesterton